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MerryC

Webroot program

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I have just read Kim's article and endorsement for webroot. I have a desktop, laptop and android tablet but they are not networked.  I have been using AVG free for years with an ocassional cleanout with malware bytes pro, advanced system care free and crap cleaner.  They don't run simultanously so they don't conflict.  AVG is on all the time, the others I use once a month one at a time.  My QUESTION is since my 3 devices are not networked and I buy webroot since it seems to do it all ....do I have to buy it 3 times? I have windows 7 on my two computers.

Merry

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Hi MerryC,

 

You don't need to buy Webroot 3 times. You can purchase it once and it covers up to 5 devices, so you would have coverage across your Mobile, Desktop, and your Tablets. Webroot is cloud based, so it can run in parallel with other antivirus software though once you have Webroot you won't need any other software. Hope this helps.

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One form of webroot can only protect one type of computing device.  Windows, Windows RT, Android, OS X, Linux and iOS devices have to be protected separately, although they can come from the same vendor.  Windows and Windows RT, for example, are designed for completely different processor architectures no more similar than a 32-bit processor and a 64-bit processor.  Present day Windows is designed for 32 and 64-bit Intel X86 processors, while Windows RT is designed for ARM chips similar to what would be in an Android tablet or phone.  Do you remember the old Macintosh PowerPC machines?  They can't run the new OS X versions, any more than a desktop from pre-1995 can run Windows XP when they are 16-bit processors running at 100 MHz with less than 4M RAM and 500M HDD.

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Me too! I would like to know - since I have always used AVG and all the free programs Kim has recommended except I bought Malwarebytes pro and Carbonite. But Kapersky (the new sponsor) seems to take care of everything and I have a laptop, desktop (not networked together) and tablet - and according to the answers above, it seems I only would have to purchase it once for all three of my computers and not have to use any other program for protection even though they are NOT networked. Am I correct?

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While I do not work for Kim Komando, I can tell you that just because a tech pundit changes sponsorship partners, that should not be considered a indication that the first sponsor is no longer a good product/service. There are many contractual issues when it comes to marketing and ad campaigns specifically. Sometimes there are disputes about the delivery of the ad, whether or not the ad should be scripted, the length of the sponsorship, and many more possible issues. It is also general practice not to discuss those contractual differences with the fan base or listening audience. And the most common reason a switch in sponsors occurs is that the new sponsor simply offers a better deal; such as a higher payment for the advertising, the inclusion of a coupon code or discount offer, the ability to use the product/service in your own business practice as a free or discounted rate, and more.

The truth is, Kaspersky and Webroot are equally capable. However, with that said, no security software is perfect; which is why we always recommend a sensible suite of software tools from multiple vendors. But it is also possible to overdo it and end up posing a negative impact on your system performance. Each time you add a new software tool of any kind, your system's processor has more computation per cycle to complete when they are running. That means less resources are available for all other software tools, and operating system resources as well. So basically, if nothing is broken, don't fix it. If your current suite of solutions is working for you, there's no reason to change it; especially if it means making a payment to yet another vendor.

 

The most important thing to remember is that even with all the best security tools available, and even if you pay for their more advanced features, the single most common point of failure is you. Practicing good, safe web browsing, not falling victim to phishing scams, not assisting in the spread of spam e-mail and social media posts, and not visiting nefarious websites or connecting via vulnerable hot spots will do more to protect your system and the data it contains than any software product ever can.

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OK, I switched to Kaspersky last winter.  In January I bought a new computer (laptop).  Going from a PC to laptop is a new learning experience for me in addition to learning Windows 10.  The past couple of months I haven't been able to pay one of my credit card bills online.  This month I talked to a tech at the cr. cd. co. to find out why I couldn't login. Finally after trying different avenues, I had to disable Kaspersky in order to login.  

 

Does this make sense?

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