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What is the deal, with PC-compatibility, the netbios daemon, samba, and port #s 137,138,139 & #445 ?

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What is the deal, with PC-compatibility, the netbios daemon, the samba technology, and (outbound [?]) port #s 137,138,139 & #445 ?

 

All I know, is that these ports were open on TCP & UDP (I think, outbound to my local network), until I blocked-them with the Mac third-party application called "Little Snitch" .

 

 

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See the answers for the thread in: http://superuser.com/questions/637696/what-is-netbios-does-windows-need-its-ports-137-and-138-open

 

All 4 ports are used to a certain extent on your local network for standard Internet Protocol and any Samba protocol network attached devices, normally including any router or modem which you use to connect to the Internet.  These actually have little or nothing to do with PC-compatibility and are defined with reference to the OSI Open Systems Interconnect model used for ANY device which connects to a local network or the Internet, whether router, network interface card, server, workstation, camera, SCADA controls, modem, or other networking devices.

 

If you have any SAMBA devices, such as a NAS (network attached storage) or shared diskspace on another workstation using the SAMBA protocol, THEN you are using a (originally Windows proprietary) protocol which was PC-compatible.  NFS (Network File System) is an alternative developed originally by Sun Microsystems, SFTP (Secure File Transfer Procol) using SSH (secure shell) login protection and encryption, and SSHFS (Secure SHell File System) are also available as alternates.  With NFS and SSHFS, the remote devices are simply seen by your operating system as part of your file system.

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