Jump to content
JavaScript is currently disabled in your browser. In order to watch videos JavaScript needs to be enabled. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.
Your browser is out of date and not supported. Click here to download the latest version of Internet Explorer.
BigSky

2009 Macbook Pro Disrupts Home Internet

Recommended Posts

I have a 2009 Macbook Pro that appears to disrupt/interfere with my home wifi service.  My Macbook was constantly looking for wifi networks and our internet on other devices would constantly be disrupted.  We contacted the internet provider.  They sent a technician to check our lines and router.  All, according to the technician, were working properly.  We tested it with my Macbook Pro and the technician told me that it was my Macbook that was disrupting and interfering with the service.  Consequently, we have tried using the internet with other devices, including computers, other than my Macbook and the technician appears to be correct.  I have searched and can't find a solution to this.  ls there some setting or settings that I can change on this computer to eliminate this problem?  Thanks in advance.

 

Thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first thing to check is which signal range and channel your router is set to. If your other devices support the 5Ghz signal, switch your WiFi signal to broadcast in that range. You may have to enter the settings of each device and set them to connect via that signal range. This is especially helpful if you use a microwave or wireless phone in close proximity to your router, as many of those appliances operate in the 2.4Ghz range (which is the default for WiFi networks. If any of your devices require the 2.4Ghz range, then you'll have to stick with that setting, but you may be able to change the channel used on that frequency. You should have the option to choose a channel between (and including) 1 through 11. 6 is the default channel, but you can sometimes avoid interference from appliances by switching to either 1 or 11.

The setting on your Macbook alone should not be preventing the entire WiFi network from being accessible. My guess is it is some other wireless interference, either from one of your home appliances or even one of your neighbors (if their home is close enough). That would make more sense as to why one or more can connect, but others can't. And if your router is located on one far side of your home, you can also strengthened the signal to your house by placing aluminum foil behind it (in the direction to the exterior of your home). Incidentally, that also helps to prevent your neighbor(s) from hopping onto your network.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

     Thanks for your response.  First, clarifying information and then a question.  Clarifying information, the only thing in our house that fits what you have described is our microwave and the problems I experience are when that is not being utilized.  I have no smart T.V.s and we have no landline in our house.  When I use a tablet or my 2016 Macbook, nobody gets kicked out.  However, when using the Macbook in my first post, people are constantly get kicked out whether using a smart phone, computer, ipod or tablet.  Does this information cause you to suggest anything beyond what you already have?

     The question, the settings you've suggested to be changed within the router, how is that done?  I'm sure it is router brand-specific; but, is that information, are those settings, accessed through my computer?

     Once again, thanks for your previous response and thanks for your subsequent response should you be so inclined.

 

Thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duly noted, but I would still try changing the channel and/or frequency range just to see if there is a setting where all devices play nicely together.

Every router is different, but most are accessible from your web browser on any device connected to your network by entering either 192.168.1.1 or 10.0.0.1 in the address. Some routers may even use a separate node, such as 192.168.2.1 or 10.0.1.1. You'll know when you have it right because the browser should prompt you for a username and password to access the router's configuration screens. You may even be able to see the router in your file manager window as a network device. In Windows, it might have (Gateway) next to the device name (I can only assume something similar on Mac OS X). Selecting that device should open a web browser window and point it to the correct internal IP address of the router, resulting in the same login prompt.

If you've never setup login credentials for your router, you must determine what the default credentials are for your particular router. For example, most Linksys routers use a blank username and Admin for the password by default. In some cases, it's Admin for both. Different brands/models may have different defaults. And if you've never accessed your router's configuration screens before, then you also have never setup WPA2 encryption on your WiFi network, which you really should do.

 

From there, you really should consult the user manual for your specific brand and model router. You can usually find a label on the bottom or side of the router with the model and version information. With that information, you can search online for a copy of the manual, or even find some tutorials that walk you through the various options available in the configuration screens. And don't worry, if you set something that seems to mess things up and you can't figure how to undo it, just find the reset button on the router (usually a small pin hole you can use a paper clip to push in on). Holding that reset button down for more than 10 seconds should reset it to factory settings, just as it was when you first bought it.

 

First thing you should do is check the router manufacturer's website for any firmware updates that may be available. You'll have to download the latest firmware update to your computer, then flash it to the router via the appropriate configure screen. That alone may fix your particular issue. However, you should proceed by configuring your SSID name, and WPA2 encryption password. Then, change your router's own login name and password, to protect your router's settings from being access/changed by others. At this point, you'll need to update the WiFi login settings on all of your devices and see if they work properly. If your problems still exists, the it's time to try changing the range (between 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz) and channel (1-11) until you find a combination that seems to work. If after all that, you still continue to experience the same issue, then perhaps it's time to consider purchasing a newer router. You can usually find very affordable Linksys routers at Walmart for $40 - $80, or you can get a slightly more reliable Netgear or DLink router at Best Buy or another electronics store in your area. You'll want either an 802.11N or 802.11AC compliant router. Those should be suitable for the widest range of devices, from new to old legacy devices as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

-advertisement-
×