Jump to content
JavaScript is currently disabled in your browser. In order to watch videos JavaScript needs to be enabled. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.
Your browser is out of date and not supported. Click here to download the latest version of Internet Explorer.
leftblank15

I'm a fan of grc.com's "Shields Up!" site -- Shouldn't my modem/router "stealth" my incoming software-ports ?

Recommended Posts

I'm a fan of grc.com's "Shields Up!" site -- Shouldn't my modem/router "stealth" my incoming software-ports ?

 

In probing the recent "DoublePulsar" incoming-software-TCP-port#445 (SMB/Samba), it only shows a "closed", and not a "stealth"ed status .

 

Shouldn't my modem/router, be doing a better job of "stealth"ing, my incoming-software-ports ?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not by default.  You can possibly change that port to stealth mode, but that is a common connection port for intranetwork communication for those who don't set up SSH to Windows servers.  (Again, used to be common practice.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Network Address Translation (NAT), IIRC actually was designed for virtual machines to be accessible to the outside Internet world as well as the local network, with firewalls to control the accessibility.  Most routers include both firewall and NAT functionality, but the functions are separate, along with DNS pass-through and/or blocking.  If you look at the TCP/IP protocol stack, or other protocols, such as NetBIOS or IPX, the functions above are all in the Transport layer, but are different functions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NAT is designed to make only one IP address visible for the entire network, not to 'stealth' or mask anything.  Your router is responsible for the address translation from the Internet or WAN (Wide Area Network) to the local network.  The 'local' network can include firewalled and separately secured servers or segments for individual users or both, or connected to separate routers for segmentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to join the conversation? Become a Kim's Club member Sign in
-advertisement-
×